find the zeros of each function state the multiplicity of multiple zeros

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find the zeros of each function state the multiplicity of multiple zeros

y = x(x-8)^2

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Polynomial Graphs: Zeros and their Multiplicity ... - Purplemath


The zeroes of the function (and, yes, "zeroes" is the correct way to ... The odd-multiplicity zeroes might ... But if I add up the minimum multiplicity of each, ...
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find zeros and state multiplicity - YouTube


Feb 21, 2009 · find zeros and state multiplicity ... Finding the Zeros and Multiplicity of Each Zero ... How to find the zeros of a polynomial function by factoring ...

Find the zeroes of each function. State the multiplicity of ...


Find the zeroes of each function. State the multiplicity of multiple zeroes. y=(x+3) ... Find the zeroes of each function. State the multiplicity of multiple zeroes ...
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Find the zeros of the polynomial function and sta... - OpenStudy


Find the zeros of the polynomial function and state the ... function and state the multiplicity of each ... pattern of zeroes, any multiple of g(x ...
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Find the zeros of the polynomial function and state the ...


Find the zeros of the polynomial function and state the multiplicity of each ... Find the zeros of the polynomial function and state the ... Write a function ...
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Zeros and multiplicities - CATs - Educational Studies


Zeros and multiplicities << prev chpt: ... The zeros of a polynomial function p(x) ... Find the zeros and multiplicity of each polynomial.
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IMPORTANT! Find all the zeros of each function. ... - OpenStudy


State the multiplicity of any multiple zeros. y= ... Find all the zeros of each function. State the multiplicity of any multiple zeros. y= ...
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Suggested Questions And Answer :


Find zeros of the polynomial function & state the multiplicity of each. f(x) = 3(x + 8)2(x - 8)3

6*(x+8)^2 *(x-8)^3 zeroes at x=-8 (2 times) & at x=8 (3 times)
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find the zeros of the polynomial function and state the multiplicity of each f(x)= x^4(x-8)^2

x^4 ( x - 8 )^2 =  0 x^4 = 0 or ( x - 2)^2 = 0 x = 0 or x - 2 = 0 x = 0 or x = 8
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Find the zeros for the polynomial function and give the multiplicity for each zero

f(x) = 4(x^2)(x+6)^2 Find the zeroes:  x = 0, multiplicity 2, x = -6, multiplicity 2 Does the graph cross the x-axis? No.  Each part- 4, x^2, and (x+6)^2- can never be negative, so f(x) can never be negative. Does the graph touch the x-axis and turn around? In other words, does f(x) e
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find the zeros of each function state the multiplicity of multiple zeros

start: y=x(x-8)^2 zeroes...y=0, 8, 8
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find a polynomial function of degree four with -3 as a zero multiplicity 1,

(x+3)(x-3)(x-3)(x+2) = 0 (x^2 - 9)(x^2 - x - 6) = 0 x^4 - x^3 - 6x^2 - 9x^2 + 9x + 54 = 0 x^4 - x^3 - 15x^2 + 9x + 54 = 0
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complex, rational and real roots

The quintic function should have 5 roots.  The changes of sign (through Descartes) tell us the maximum number of positive roots. Since there are two changes of sign there is a maximum of 2 positive roots. To find the number of negative roots we negate the terms with odd powers and check
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find a polynomial function of degree 4 with -3

y=x(x+3)^3............
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Find a polynomial function to model the data.

polynomial function of degree4 with -4 as a zero of multiplicity 3 and 0 as a zero of multplicity 1
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Derivative Problem

To find the derivative, we will apply the chain rule. It states: if f(x) = g(h(x)) then f'(x) = g'(h(x))*h'(x) In other words, the derivative of f(x) is equal to the original inner function (h) plugged into the derivative of the outer function (g') multiplied by the derivative of the inner function
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show that the function f(x)= sqrt (x^2 +1) satisfies the 2 hypotheses of the Mean Value Theorem

f(x) = sqrt(x^2 + 1) ; [(0, sqrt(8)] Okay, so for the Mean Value Theorem, two things have to be true: f(x) has to be continuous on the interval [0, sqrt(8)] and f(x) has to be differentiable on the interval (0, sqrt(8)). First find where sqrt(x^2 + 1) is continous on. We know that for square roots
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